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to success. the man who turned the tide for procter & gamble. and leon panetta on how much we should worry about korea. and if that's not enough -- >> i really do believe that the pearl harbor of the future could be very well a cyberattack on this country. >>> nervous markets this week, partly due to new threats from north korea. the company threatening to use nuclear weapons, and the country respond by moving an advanced missile system to the pacific. i spoke to leon panetta, asking him about north korea's motivation and what the consequences may be, all part of the global conversation this week. >> a lot of this i think is aimed probably more at the internal situation in north korea, aimed at improving the new leader's credibility, his credentials as a leader. but at the same time because they have capabilities and they're developing those capabilities, i don't think we can take anything for granted here. i think the greater likelihood is miscalculation, that they do something that escalates quickly. that's the greater danger. >> let me ask you about another concern, and that is of cours
to work there. >>> special exclusive. former cia director, former defense secretary. leon panetta is with us. so much to talk about with nuclear threats from north korea. plus he has some big concerns about cyber security that he wants to talk about. you're going to ask him about the killing of osama bin laden. so you don't want to miss all of that coming up next hour here. >> let's take a look at where we stand as we approach this final stretch on easter monday. dow jones industrial average down 24 points on the session. 25 points lower. 14,553. coming back from the record high last year. nasdaq composite also in the red with a decline in the session of 29 points. nasdaq really the weakest of all the major averages down almost 1% on the nasdaq at 3238. s&p 500 down about half a percent, 1561. >> let's talk about it in today's closing bell exchange. michael yoshakami, cnbc contributor from destination wealth management. barry knapp. steve sachs from pro shares advisers and our own rick santelli. michael, can we do as well as in the second quarter as we did in the first quarter? >>
of procter & gamble shares his message for today's leaders. >>> then former defense secretary leon panetta on how much we should worry about korea, and if that's not enough -- >> i really do believe that the pearl harbor of the future could be very well a cyber attack on this country. th an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob c
." stick around for that interview with leon panetta. i'll see you tomorrow. >>> and it is 4:00 on wall street. do you know where your money is? hi, everybody. welcome back to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo on the floor of the new york stock exchange. market kicking off the second quarter of the year in the red today although just by a fraction after a record first three months of the year. take a look at how we're settling out on the street today. it was close but no cigar. look at that push going into the close. at the low the dow jones industrial average down about 47 points. we are coming all the way back as we approach the settlements here on the floor. things are settling out with a decline of just a fraction on the dow industrials, down about six points. nasdaq composite and s&p performing worse. nasdaq down nearly 1%. standard & poors index giving out seven points, one-half of 1%. first day of the second quarter in the books. how should you portfolio be positioned this time around? back with me is michael yoshikami. mark lehman. gentlemen, good to see you. thank you ver
, 29 years old. he's young and untested. just today former u.s. defense secretary leon panetta said the u.s. must be prepared and very concerned because we cannot know kim jong un's motivations and intentions. it's because of that the u.s. is going ahead with a military statement of its own tonight. our chief foreign correspondent richard engel has reached seoul, south korea tonight and starts us off from there. >> reporter: good evening, brian. south korea thinks the north is bluffing, but pyongyang is playing a dangerous game of brinksmanship which the u.s. is matching with a show of force. military exercises by u.s. and south korean forces.
to me, i remember talking to former press secretary leon panetta who said his biggest fear was a lone wolf attack would be the hardest thing to track and that's what we are looking agent right now. national security analyst and homeland and former security advisor to president bush. what about this issue that we could be looking at a lone wolf, and as drew just said, we don't have a possible description of this person, no one has claimed responsibility. there's no motive. will we find this person? >> the lone wolf is the hardest in any investigation you rely on communication and interaction with others as one of your first leads. i think it's unfair to suggest that this is sort of unusual. they've just gotten through the crime scene exploitation, they have sent that information down to quantico, to the fbi bomb facility. they will get a lot of important leads and information from there. there are thousands of hours of videotape that they have to painstakingly go through. they're back in 24 to 36 hours out from this massive attack with all these injuries and all these fatalities, and t
polite. he called the pentagon "a big damn bureaucracy." it does not sound like leon panetta at all. [laughter] are, leon, we're quoting you. the military is not and should never the run like operation. but that does not mean we don't have a good deal to learn from what the private sector has achieved over the past 20-30 years in which reducing layers of upper and middle management not only reduced costs and micromanagement, but also led to more agile and effective organizations. and more empowered junior leaders. in light of all these trends, we have to examine whether dod a structured and incentivize to ask for more and do more. that entails taking a hard look at requirements. how they are generated and where they are generated from. it could turn out that making dramatic changes in each of these areas could prove unwise, untenable, or politically impossible. yet we have no choice but to take a close look at how we can do all of this better. in order to address acquisition, personnel and overhead costs in smart ways, they have not been done before. we need time, flexibility, and s
done a magnificent job. i thought petraeus did a great job. i in the thought out in california, leon panetta did a good job. i really admired -- the final thing i don't think we can stop terrorism hundred percent. >> i agree with you. there is a difference between operationally they have been incredibly good, in terms of assessment of our enemies, every since the russians exploded the bomb in '49 we've got it wrong every single time. >> bill: we will talk with a doctor, next, that tried to save a terror victim's life. a very emotional interview as the factor continues all across the u.s.a. and all ar >> bill: he found himself 30 feet from the bomb blast. the doctor joins us now from boston. so first, the woman who eventually died, doctor, were you first on the scene there? >> i was one of the first. i don't know if i was the first one. several people converged on the mass of bodies. we pulled a gentleman are out from under her and begin working on her, too. she was basically in arrest at the time. we thought we had a faint pulse. we started cpr we weren't sure of the pulse. we starte
." it does not sound like leon panetta at all. [laughter] the military is not and should never the run like operation. but that does not mean we don't have a good deal to learn from what the private sector has achieved over the past 20-30 years in which reducing layers of upper and middle management not only reduced costs and micromanagement, but also led to more agile and effective organizations. and more empowered junior leaders. in light of all these trends, we have to examine whether dod a structured and incentivize to ask for more and do more. that entails taking a hard look at requirements. how they are generated and where they are generated from. it could turn out that making dramatic changes in each of these areas could prove unwise, untenable, or politically impossible. yet we have no choice but to take a close look at how we can do all of this better. in order to address acquisition, personnel and overhead costs in smart ways, they have not been done before. we need time, flexibility, and support and partnership of congress during we also need long-term budget certainty. one of th
paid close attention to what the secretary said about the assignment from leon panetta to realize the full potential of the india defense trade and cut through bureaucratic red tape. the only thing he needs to do that is something i will present him from the u.s. india policy studies, and that is the gun mesh, who is the removal of obstacles and impediments. this you could take back with you. [applause] >> thank you. >> thank you all. please allow us a moment while we get the secretary out. think you very much. -- thank you very much. >> in their message to the president, up willens and brian folsom look at the potential effects of a growing national the fence -- growing deficit. they are third prize winners in this year's student cam video. >> what exactly is the deficit? it is defined by an excess of liabilities over assets, or expenditures over income. in simpler terms, the amount of money the united states sends that it cannot pay for. take of the component that directly influence the deficits are budget, a plan for expenditures, savings -- how much money are government keeps
out in california, leon panetta did a good job. i really admired -- the final thing i don't think we can stop terrorism hundred percent. >> i agree with you. there is a difference between operationally they have been incredibly good, in terms of assessment of our enemies, every since the russians exploded the bomb in '49 we've got it wrong every single time. >> bill: we will talk with a doctor, next, that tried to save a terror victim's life. a very emotional interview as the factor continues all across the u.s.a. and all around the world. >>> there is breaking news out of washington tonight. i'm greta van susteren. a letter sent to u.s. senator roger wicker testing positive for ricin. letter never made it to capitol hill or lawmaker's office. the letter was intercepted as an off-site testing facility in maryland of them learned about the poisonous letter about the boston marathon bombing. at this point there is no word of a suspect or motive. we are told there is nothing to indicate the letter that was addressed to senator wicker is connected to the deadly bombings in boston. stay w
reviews of this whole case. >> the highest level, juan. the president didn't follow up with leon panetta to see how the shooting turned out. he says i don't have any knowledge. nobody had any knowledge that the consulate was secured and nobody knew they needed help. >> greg: big lesson here is whistle-blowers only matter if they are blowing a whistle on tobacco company or republican leader. >> correct knee if i'm wrong -- >> look, you guys wanted to go back and find out who shot j.r. -- this is a waste of time. >> greg: don't let a crisis go to waste. >> andrea: one more question. the president did tell ed henry he would get back to him lousmt do you think they will handle this? >> dana: i would say, hey, we don't have anything for you. >> andrea: new information on the boston bombing investigation how much taxpayer today's supported the lives of the suspected terrorists. also, did president obama inadvertently suggest that he supported proils profiling of muslims during today's press conference. we'll show you what he said and you can decide. stay with us. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ i had enou
this week, we'll tell you what other 2016 possible candidate will appear with her tomorrow. no it isn't leon panetta. and kick off our women in the world series with "newsweek" and "daily beast" editor in chief, tina brown. >>> plus let the good times roll, the 135th easter egg roll at the white house. as the president and first family throw a party for more than 35,000 children of all ages on the south lawn. it is wonderful to see all of you, welcome, you guys brought the great weather. >> today we want you to have a great time. we want you to run around, we want you to go over and see the white house gardens. >> but hoops time with the basketball editor in chief doesn't go so well. reports are he was only 2 for 22. >> and thankfully, on the mend -- an encouraging sign as louisville guard, kevin ware comes through surgery successfully. and the team hopes can even join them in his hometown of atlanta next weekend as the cardinals play in the final four. and good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. is there or isn't there? all signs point to a senate deal on immigration reform. but m
korean coast to monitor the country's military moves. and former defense secretary leon panetta warned the u.s. should be concerned by north korea's threats. >> i think we got to be very concerned about the provocation, the level of provocation that north korea is engaged in. they have been in the process of testing icbms. they also have been testing nuclear weapons. the kind of provocation and bellicosity they're showing now with their rhetoric raises a lot of concern. >> in just about 30 minutes, president obama will unveil a human brain mapping research program. the brain initiative project comes after a pledge the president made in a state of the union to create jobs through research. this project will get jump started with $100 million in 2014 and seek to help researchers find new ways to treat cure, and prevent brain disorders like alzheimer's and epilepsy. >>> now to california. a federal judge ruled that the city of stockton is broke and eligible to file for bankruptcy. after a three-day hearing, the judge rejected claims the city did not negotiate in good faith to resolve debt
and former defense secretary leon panetta told me, there is reason for concern. but if you look at the stock market, traders are just not concerned. we're here with bob pisani now to talk about this. we know that the fed is driving everything, bob, but no concern whatsoever about what's happening in north korea. >> and when i talk to the trading community, i hear what we've been hearing for a long time. there's been so much bluster from the north koreans for so many years, that it hasn't amounted to much, why should it now? and put up the south korean stock market. you can so the proof in this, this is three months, no movement at all. but even the south koreans aren't that worried. here's what worries me a little bit. the whole nuclear doctrine we use, mutually assured destruction, is based on the idea that the other side is rational. that if they do missile tests, we send in nuclear capable jets to do exercises with the south koreans. but we don't know anything about this new guy, this kim jong-un fellow. he's 30 years old. we don't know if he's in charge of the country or not. and the con
the seals under the control of the c.i.a. director. >> charlie: leon panetta was calling the shots. >> he was calling the shots. there was a commander on the ground who was sort of running the operation but panetta had control. >> charlie: he could have called it off. >> he could have called it off. it bass under the authorities to operate in pakistan the military can't go there. and the c.i.a. has what they call covert action authority. so they did it under c.i.a. control. >> reporter: covert action authority from the congress? >> well, it comes from the president. and congress signs off on it. it's how the c.i.a. operates around the world. they carry out covert actions which are technically deniable. the president auorizes them under what they call a finding. and you're basically authorized to go break the law in other countries and you have the presidential authority to do it. if it goes badly, the u.s. can deny knowledge of it. now in this case, if the bin laden operation had gone badly it would have been pretty hard for the united states to deny any knowledge of what happened. >> cha
, the voice of redemption because it was not just about the gangs. it was about how i chased my life for leon panetta for i could get rid of drugs, it of violence and begin a life as an activist and the writer as i have been for 40 years. >> what does the terms economy? >> it is really the mexican descendant, we have been here for so long. people think it is just an immigrant. constantly replenishing. several generations. we call ourselves to, partly connected indigenously. the people. they call them aztecs and took him back to something that in the 60's became vibrant, political, change. so is kind of like a decision to the sake of my live identity which also includes justice and a better country. >> solar you when you join the gain? >> i was 11 years old. i got involved in the most intense part of it. not everybody does. gains, neighborhood gangs. a lot of guys who were in it, around it. some guys get into a really heavy. get into heroin. i got into -- house in and out of jail, jamal. violent things including writing, including -- the return to give me for some murder the never -- attempted
and you have people talking about a future 9/11, and the reality -- >> rose: by the way it was leon panetta before the senate. >> and our view and what we write about in the book is what we need to be fearful of is a coordinated attack that is bo cyber and physica so yo can imagine situation in the future where a cyber attack takes out the electricity of a city which makes it easier for terrorists to conduct a physical attack and that is what the real fear is. in terms of -- >> rose: and how real is the threat? >> >> the issue of the vick bring is the number one priority for the for the people who are looking at this, we are so dependent on the electric grid. >> and you saw inklings of what it can do even though it was not cyber after sandy. >> that is correct, many people arlookinto hden the vick grid, a similar project is around theanking syem because if the banking system were to clams. so the critical infrastructure as you know is being beefed up very, very strongly in many of the countries, including the united states, i think we are going to be beyond that as a threat reasonab
, then congressman, my colleague at the time, leon panetta, appeared before this committee and he talked about how the american people didn't trust the government any more. he spoke of the importance of making the budget process work so that our government could start to restore that credibility. this is what he told this committee. 20 years ago, he says, we need to make government more efficient. more creative, make it an instrument of long-term economic growth, not an impediment. and make it a source of investment in our future not a robber of our children's birthright. all of those words ring, i think even more true today. the american people will not and should not tolerate congress and the white house kicking the can down the road any longer on making tough decisions. nor will they tolerate our failure to make significant progress in addressing some of the tough management challenges faced by agencies across government. so my strong recommendation to my colleagues today is that we confirm this nomination of mrs. burwell, properly, so she can bring her considerable kills and intellect to bear
got from leon panetta to realize the full potential of u.s.-india defense trade and to cut through the bureaucratic red tape. now, i think the only thing that he needs to do that is something i'm going to now present him from the chair and u.s.-india policy studies and that is the independento god who is the re-- indo god who is the remover of impediments. >> i need it. [applause] >> thank you all. please allow us a moment, stay in your seats and tweet or whatever while we get the secretary out. thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> the u.s. house returns from its two-week spring recess. gaveling in at 2:00 p.m. for legislative work. several things including one dealing with hydropower development in utah. another on the acquisition of historical battlefield sites. live coverage here on c-span 2:00 p.m. eastern. the senate came in this morning at 10:00 eastern and just a short while ago confirmed the nomination of patty schwartz to be the court on the third circuit court of appeals. t
the $100 billion in defense cuts. and bob gates and leon panetta and chuck hague l said we can't provide the security for america that we need if you do that to us. it really is a difficult problem -- you can't forecast what is going to happen. when is the next 9/11? when is the next somalia? what is -- there's uncertainty. and very dangerous world is bombing the pentagon. they have the same problem; however, the bucket of the united states has. they are spending more and more people retired or try care for life. they increase spending for the employees or if you want to call uniform military employees. they -- the same way the federal budget is. the joke is -- it's not much a joke. we'll have the best trained senior officer in the history of the modern world with the most sophisticated weapon but only one everything will be paid out to people who served before. that's the cost bluntly of an all-volunteer army. i'm not saying we have one. you have to assume that you're going to have to increase benefits and pay if you want to have people put the life on the line. >> host: where the money
was approved by leon panetta, and some lawmakers were concerned that the medal would be placed above those for battlefield valor. chuck hagel nixed the medal in favor of in addition to existing medals. >>> he's trying to rebuild a tainted political career. but now mark sanford is accused of trespassing at his ex-wife's house. jenny san trdford said -- sanford said she caught him going out her back door in february using a cell phone as a flashlight. he's been ordered to appear in court two days after he runs for a congressional seat next month. >>> producer seth mcfarland has gone on twitter defending himself in a controversy tied to the boston marathon bombings. he's strongly condemning a doctored online clip of his animated show that made the rounds on the internet. it shows the star of "family guy" using his cell phone to set off explosions at the boston marathon. that fake clip was based on scenes from an episode aired last month. it's been pulled by the fox network. he issued a statement expressing his outrage and he adds "the event was a crime and tragedy and my thoughts are with the
. it mentions that secretary leon panetta, your predecessor had instead taken another approach of file sharing rather than building a single integrated system from scratch. he said he couldn't defend the past performance on record sharing. he said he stopped for their spending on the process and has restructured the program oversight. you know, i was in the other body before i came here. i've been here five years and that was on the veteran -- the subcommittee appropriations subcommittee dealing with veterans from some time over there mr. secretary. we didn't even have ipad and this has been developed in four short years. it seems to me that the fact that we have been talking in 2013 about file sharing only come in and not thinking big about a new system that our most talented people in america could certainly do to just start over and have a system that starts within the dod and moves seamlessly when you move to the system is something we ought to go to so tell us what we can expect in 30 days and elaborate if you will on your plans there. >> well i think, senator, you have said it. why can't
, too, would take a 20% cut. >> speaking of cuts. he is sounding the same warnings now that leon panetta was sounding a couple of weeks ago. hagel is saying that these cuts to the pentagon are going to devastate the agency and military readiness. >> reporter: the military was already girting for substantial cuts after the war in iraq ended and we started to drawn down in afghanistan. everybody here in uniform realized that cuts are coming. managing those cuts is what is important. the trillion dollars you're talking about, $5 hundr00 billi that was imposed and began under defense secretary bob gates. then the additional 500 billion or so came under the sequestration. so the u.s. military is already preparing for drastic cuts and, quite frankly, they feel that that one trillion in that short period of time is just too much to bear. >> jim miklaszewski, stick with us. we have got other stories that we can talk to you about in this block, if you can. >>> just days before the senate begins debate on gun reform president obama is looking for support outside of washington, d.c. yesterday, at a
, senator. >> thank you. previously this committee had a hearing within defense secretary leon panetta andgera dempsey which benghazi was discussed at considerable length and general dempsey at the time expressed his views and i am not paraphrasing but the nature of the attack and in particular the fact that multiple mortar shells were hit and rooftop demonstrated to him at the time that it was organized military attack and he had something -- something -- -- said something to the effect that it he thought it was obvious it was an organized military attack. i would interested in your assessment of it was obvious at the time? >> no sir, it was not. the one thing they did, there were two or three faces of the attack. i would characterize the attack on the temporary admission facility is has much more of a vandalism and looting thing. the mortar attack which took place took 10 or 11 minutes and demonstrated some operational deficiency. i would commend to you and i don't know if you have seen this, a briefing that we put together visually re-creates as best we could with the actual events
of mine -- a big damn bureaucracy." it does not sound like leon panetta at all. [laughter] the military is not and should never the run like operation. but that does not mean we don't have a good deal to learn from what the private sector has achieved over the past 20-30 years in which reducing layers of upper and middle management not only reduced costs and micromanagement, but also led to more agile and effective organizations. and more empowered junior leaders. in light of all these trends, we have to examine whether dod a structured and incentivize to ask for more and do more. that entails taking a hard look at requirements. how they are generated and where they are generated from. it could turn out that making dramatic changes in each of these areas could prove unwise, untenable, or politically impossible. yet we have no choice but to take a close look at how we can do all of this better. in order to address acquisition, personnel and overhead costs in smart ways, they have not been done before. we need time, flexibility, and support and partnership of congress during we also need
illness >> the secretary and the former secretary of defense leon panetta have said that this national crisis, there is a shortage of national health care providers. the fda is moving to hire more. they have hired a thousand in the last 8 months or so with the intention of hiring 600 more to serve this population. it is an issue. a recent study that came out just this week was mentioning that many qualified health-care professionals do not take health insurance. it keeps people on the health care plan from getting military health care and from hiring qualified personnel. >> this is the plan for active service members? >> this service the active service members and their families as lafco as active retirees. there is a group of people that we're injured on active duty or became injured on active duty and it was service related and they might have received a medical retirement. >> let's take a couple of snap shot looks at the veterans' population. some statistics from the veterans affairs department. 22 estimated total number, million. the enrollees in the health care system, almost 9 mi
secretary leon panetta when you went on that sad, must have been the most painful day of your life to receive the casket of your son, what did they say to you? >> they said that they would find out what happened and get back to me. because i told them, i have to know. they all promised me. martha: and how have they followed up on that? what attempts have you made to find out what they have learned? how has that gone? >> nobody has got even back to me at all, not one word, other than one clerk called me and started reading me from the timeline, which i already had, and that was it. martha: i know you are hoping that there will be a select committee put in place, and congressman wolf has been leading that charge. do you think that -- what do you think that would accomplish, and is that your only hope that remains of finding out what happened, and trying to prevent that from happening to anybody else in our consulates and embassies? >> well, i don't know what goes on over there, and i personally don't care all that much. all i do know is the way that they were treated, and the reactio
defense secretary leon panetta in general to see which was discussed at considerable length. general dempsey expressed his views then i'm paraphrasing but the nature of the attack that top demonstrated to him aro organid ttack. it wa he said something to the effect that he thought it was obvious and was an organized military effect. i'd be interested if you thought it was obvious at the time. >> no, sir, it was there were two or three phases of the attack on the temporary admissions facility. the mortar attack took about 10 or 11 minute, doesn't stray did some operational efficiency. i don't know if you've seen it, sir, a briefing we put together that visually re-creates as best we could with the actual events and i'd be happy to have it brought to you so you could see our best replication of what occurred during the phases of the attacks. >> i would be appreciative of that. thank you. do you have anything to add on that? >> i would say personally, my instincts were what weee watching was particularly on the was not what i would normal activity based sategic sessment that it are di
essence leon panetta describe it the only game in town. legality. it brings me to the last point i want to make. i think a strong case can be made the state of war exists between the united and al qaeda and taliban forces. and that most drone strikes perhaps not all are per michelle. my lawyer is i'm no a lawyer. my wife is a lawyer. i rely here on leading scholar of the arm of armed conflict from michael schmidt to i'll emphasize it's also the view of the president who was a constitutional lawyer. before he became president. the attorney general, and the office of legal council which cites the supreme court. the common view that the practice and opinion of the states has changed at least since september 11th. after september 11th not before to accept the possible of a noninternational armed cob flict between a state and terrorist group permitting the state to use military force. if that state persistently unwilling or unable to prevent an ongoing pattern of attacks. finally, i don't think there is anything about drone strikes in particular necessarily vie rate lates the humanitarian la
management review, which comes due by about the end of may. , mr. chairman, in february leon panetta created, and you endorsed, the distinguished warfare medal. >> yeah. >> two weeks later a new secretary of defense comes in, and there is a big storm about it, and all of a sudden he has appointed you to rereview the notion of this new kind of medal. and two weeks ago with your endorsement he came out and basically said forget it, it is not a medal. it is a distinguishing device. so the whole issue of precedence even goes away. what happened? >> well, for one thing, i think as a first principle we have to remember that the challenge that secretary panetta gave us was to recognize the contributions of those who may be remote from the battlefield but having significant impact on the battlefield. we stayed true to that principle. our initial swing at this if you will, to use a baseball metaphor, was that a separate medal would be preferable, and we had consensus among the joint chiefs in that regard. then we talked about precedence , and the precedence became kind of the third rail actually. whe
administration, and hillary clinton batted for him, a tense moment between hillary clinton and leon panetta inside the national security council meeting were they were -- they were not fighting, but there was a intense exchange where she was sticking up for her guy, panetta stuck up for the nci, brokered a deal, but they retained a degree of authority of what it did in pakistan. >> and you report in "the way of the knife" there's a wing that's blocked off from the rest of the embassy? >> right. so the embassy itself has grown dramatically. you look there, and there's construction at this secure site, and so a lot of, you know, as the cia presence expanded, the cia station has expanded, and that wing is, you know, is cia operations. when you look at it, you wonder, i mean, this building that's going on, it sort of seems like there's going to be this long term american presence. large american presence in pack stapp, but i wonder, after 2014, the draw down in afghanistan, whether we will have built buildings for the presence that's not going to be there after 2014. >> charles in lawton, oklah
, is that the area where you can't really blow anything off at this point as a bluff? >> well, leon panetta said it in his interview with cnbc, we don't know his motivations or intentions right now. but it's clear -- and talking about this cycle of provocation, accommodation, aid. repeated over and over again over the past 30 years, but what concerns some of the military leadership is during that time, it's bought the north koreans time to develop their nuclear weapons program, to develop their ballistic missile program. and some argue that that cycle has to be broken. and that's where china comes in. if china doesn't take actions, firm action against north korea, stop delivering the aid in violation of u.n. resolutions and sanctions, then north korea will continue on this pattern. and in terms of talking about bluffs, while there's been a lot of bluster out of the pentagon recently, there were more u.s. forces there two weeks ago than there are today. two guided missile destroyers were there two weeks ago, and the f-22 presence, the b-52 bombers, which they mention are nuclear capable, the b-2
to attack american forces and she down helicopters if it was ever repeated. in essence, leon panetta had good reason to describe the strikes as the only game in town. we're stuck with the drones. final argument, legality. this brings me to the last point i want to make which is a strong case can be made that a state of war exists between the united states and al qaeda and taliban and most drone strikes are permissible under that all but i'm not a lawyer. we have some wires with us who will disagree. i rely on leading scholars of the law of armed conflict, and i will emphasize this is the view of the president, who is a constitutional lawyer. the attorney general and the office of legal counsel, which cites the supreme court in supporting this opinion, says their common view of some states have changed at least since 9/11. after then, if not before, to accept the possibility of a non-international armed conflict between a state and a group permitted the state to use military force against the group subject to the law of armed conflict. such action can be taken on the territory of another
in mental health care. the secretary and former secretary of defense leon panetta have said there is a crisis of health care providers. they are moving to hire more. hired 1000 in the last eight months or so with the intention of hiring 600 more to serve the population. issue.n a recent study that came out this week was mentioning many qualified health-care professionals do not take health , but so this keeps people on military health care plan from getting quality health care, and it keeps the va from personnel.ified >> try care is the plan for active members? serv active members as well as military retirees, who has been in the service for ofyears or more, and a group medically retired personnel, so there is a group of people and or viewon active duty became ill on active duty, and they may have received of medical retirement, so they also are retired. >> as we begin our conversation, we will take snapshot looks at the veterans' population. some statistics from the veterans affairs department. this is on veterans' health care. the estimated total population is 23,328,000.
is proposing $100 billion in defense cuts in the next 10 years. and you have both bob gates and leon panetta and now chuck hagel saying, we cannot provide the security for america that we need if you do that to us. it really is a difficult problem. because you cannot forecast what is going to happen. when is the next 9/11? what is the next somalia? this difficulty, this uncertainty in a very dangerous world is bothering the pentagon. they have the same problem, however, that the budget of the united states house. they are spending more and more whoeople who are retired, -- or who are on health care for life. they are being eaten up the same way the federal budget is by defense entitlements. and at some point, the joke is, although it is not much of a joke, we will have the best trained single officer in the history of the modern world with the most sophisticated weapon, but we will only have one of him because everything else will be paid out to people live served before. of an alle cost volunteer army. i'm not saying that we should not have one, but you have to assume that you will have to
in the defense department. if you get a chance, read what hagel said yesterday. former secretary leon panetta kept talking about the sequestration is a disaster, catastrophe. hagel's tone is more of acceptance. this is happening. major cuts are coming. probably $22 billion cut in the defense budget in this fiscal year. one they'll have to implement as of now. more coming. the president's budget is coming out in the next couple of weeks. it will probably show a cut in defense. hagel is talking interestingly about safeguarding the troops, safeguarding the benefits and cutting generals and cutting unnecessary weapons. and you can see why obama put him here. he wants this kind of voice to reshape the military for the threats we really face, not from the cold war. >> bill: is there sort of a silver lining to these budget cuts? >> there is. it is forcing choices. it will help squeeze out the excess waste including the enormous amount of money we spend on nuclear weapons. >> bill: there you go. so this may be the ticket. >> it is a lever to help policy change long overdue. >> bill: joe cirincione wi
for him and/or his tents most between hillary clinton and leon panetta inside the national city council meeting where they were, they weren't fighting but there was tension, tense exchange where she was to get up for her guy and a natty was sticking up for the cia. they kind of brokered a deal but ultimately the cia still maintained a degree of authority over what it did in pakistan. >> host: and you report in "the way of the knife" is a whole wing that is locked off from the rest of the embassy. >> guest: right. so the embassy itself has grown dramatically. you look at you go there, there's construction at this secure site. so all lot of, as the cia presence has expanded, the cia station has expanded. and that winning the ncaa operations. when you look at it and you wonder, this building is going on, it's sort of seems like there's going to be this long-term american presence. large american presence in pakistan but i really would after 2014 after the drawdown whether we have built these buildings for this presence that's not going to be there after 2014. >> host: charles in lawton okl
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